On This Date in Legal History

On November 14, 1968, Vietnam protesters attempted to disseminate literature against the draft and war at Lloyds Center in Portland, Oregon. The mall had a policy, however, that prohibited the distribution of handbills on its premises that had no relation to the Center’s operation. After a patron complained, security threatened to arrest the protesters if they continued to violate the Center’s rules. A lawsuit ensued– Lloyd Corporation v. Tanner.

This is the front portico of the United States Supreme Court Building. The Supreme Court is the final arbiter of the law in the United States.

This is the front portico of the United States Supreme Court Building. The Supreme Court is the final arbiter of the law in the United States.

On April 18, 1972, the case was argued before the Supreme Court. The question presented was–does a mall, open to the public, have a right to prevent visitors from exercising their First Amendment rights on their privately-owned property? You can listen to the court proceedings at https://goo.gl/QF1VrP.  On June 22, 1972, the Court held (in a 5-4 decision) Lloyds Center could prohibit others from distributing literature on their premises. You can read the Court’s opinion at https://goo.gl/0NzQMP.

About Tina Nelson
Tina Nelson

Tina Nelson is an attorney and mom. She created the LAWSUIT™ board game to teach her three children about the law. The game was an instant success. Copyrights and a patent were obtained, and Professional Games, Inc. was born. Professional Games, Inc. created this blog to educate and keep its friends and customers regularly updated about our American legal system.
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